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courses@JLR: Intro to TV Studies

Intro to TV Studies

Owner: Julie Levin Russo

Group members: 16

Description:

Television is arguably the most influential and ubiquitous mass medium of the last half century. Because of its familiarity and popularity, it is also often the medium most overlooked, dismissed, and maligned. Drawing from the history of television and of television scholarship, this course builds a theoretical framework for understanding this pivotal cultural form. We will cover interdisciplinary approaches to studying TV texts, TV audiences, and TV industries, including questions of the boundaries of "television" (from independent and avant-garde video to convergence). In the process, we'll develop our own methodological tools as critical television viewers.

| syllabus |

| YouTalk interviews with Brown students |

Brief description: FILMSTUD 7 | MW 3:15-4:30 + Screening M 7-9:30pm | AUTUMN 2010

Tags: , ,

Website: http://art.stanford.edu

Group files

new blog evaluation rubric

1334 days ago

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I gave feedback on the second round of blog essays using this revised and more effective system.

Future of Video Map

1338 days ago

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This fascinating projection may offer some inspiration for your TV2025 videos.

guidelines: final paper

1338 days ago

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WHAT

For your final assignment, you're expected to synthesize what we've learned about the study of television in a 6- page paper that draws on course texts to analyze a TV-related artifact of your choice (e.g. an episode, a program, a video, a promotion, a website, a device, or a phenomenon). You're encouraged to expand your work in one of your blog posts or video responses to produce an essay in the typical academic style. The professor will meet with you individually to help you develop your argument.

HOW

You’ll be signing up for an individual conference with the professor on Friday, December 3. Please come with:

  • A plan for which blog post you’ll expand (or another topic).
  • A specific digital artifact or related artifacts to analyze (if different from your blog post).
  • Some idea of your overall argument.
  • A list of two or three course texts that you could cite to support your argument.
  • A rough outline of how you will organize your paper.

WHEN

Your essays are due by email to jlrusso@stanford.edu by midnight on December 10. Unauthorized late work will result in grade penalties. If you'd like to include links, illustrations, or other web-based elements (although this isn't required), you may post the essay to our course blog (just email me by the deadline to let me know). You're also invited to upload your essay under Files on the website in order to share it with your classmates.

REMEMBER

Academic writing makes an argument: it never simply summarizes or restates. A thesis is something with which someone could disagree. It makes a claim to something -- it offers a reading, an interpretation, a disagreement, a recasting. Ideally, your thesis says "what" you're going to say, and also "how" you're going to get there.

Find a balance between summarizing theorists, quoting from them, and analyzing them (i.e. examining them in relation to internal logic, larger debates, considering examples in relation to their model, and/or evaluating their claims). Use your own thoughts and readings to support your theoretical points.

You can find further information and resources at Stanford's Hume Writing Center (http://hwc.stanford.edu/), including the option to make an appointment with a tutor to go over your essay.

Plagiarism will not be tolerated. For more information on avoiding plagiarism and the rest of Stanford's Honor Code, see http://stanford.edu/dept/vpsa/judicialaffairs/avoiding/guide.htm

CONTENTS [provided by email]

1. A sample student paper (from television studies), with annotations. This is an example of A-level work.

2. Two single-page handouts that offer tips on analyzing media texts.

3. "Organization," a handout that details approaches to constructing and revising a strong essay.

guidelines: group video project

1338 days ago

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WHAT

Working together in your groups of four (by letter), you will create a final video at least 10 minutes long on the theme of "TV 2025: Imagining Media Futures." You may build on and even include your work from the individual video responses and YouTalk interviews. Conceptualize your project as a video from 2025 reporting on, analyzing, or embodying some aspect of "television" (whatever it may be then). It might take the form of a how-to, a news story, a documentary, a promotion, a review, a fan commentary, or simply a sample of future programming. Similarly to the vlogs, you will be evaluated based on the incorporation of course material in creative ways, the originality of your critical perspective, and the effectiveness of its presentation in the video medium.

WHY

In this course, we've learned about the history, technology, form, ideologies, and industry of television through various scholarly approaches that illuminate its present-day evolution as a medium. To conclude our work, you are asked to imagine how TV will change over the next 15 years (or even what TV will be in 15 years – will television as we know it still exist?) based on concrete aspects of its structure and development that we've studied. By creating online videos about TV for this class, you're already part of television's future, and by collaborating on video production, you'll gain further insight into the construction of TV rhetoric and experiences.

HOW

You should correspond (and, ideally, meet in person) with your group as soon as possible to begin brainstorming and storyboarding your project. Discuss your respective skills and talents and your goals for working together.

Once you've settled on a concept, break it down into its component tasks, and establish how you can execute it with a realistic production plan. It's a good idea to divide up the duties and steps (whether different sections of the video or different stages like writing, shooting, editing) amongst yourselves.

Make sure to decide how you'll assemble the video, since the editing process will be most likely be confined to one computer (either in Meyer or one of your own). The guidelines from the resource post still apply (up to the part about uploading). Unlike with your video responses, I would recommend exporting at a medium quality rather than aiming for the smallest size – if the final file is under 1GB that should be fine.

Please be respectful and responsible in collaborating with your fellow group members. Before I allot final grades, I will ask each of you to fill out a self-evaluation of your group work (below). In most cases, one grade applies to all of you, but I will take any glaring discrepancies into account.

WHERE/WHEN

Your videos are due when we meet for our "final exam" at 12:15pm on Wednesday, December 8 in Building 320, room 105. You should bring the exported and ready-to-play video file on a computer, external hard drive or thumb drive, or CD/DVD to give to the professor.

At our meeting, we will watch and discuss/critique each video. Our scheduled time goes until 3:15pm; this may take the full three hours depending on the lengths of your projects.

The professor will take care of uploading the videos online and adding them to our course website. Because this is a public project (and to avoid Vimeo's size restrictions), they will be hosted at http://blip.tv (on my account and/or SCBN's). There are plans to later air your videos on the Stanford student television station SCBN.


Group Project Self-Evaluation Questions

1. How would you assess your level of participation?

  • I was an active collaborator in all aspects of the project
  • I did a good job on my designated responsibilities but let others take the lead in ideas and organization
  • I contributed/completed less work than I could/should have

2. What were your responsibilities within the group?

3. Did the distribution of these tasks recognize and mobilize your skills?

4. Did you feel that work on the project was allocated evenly? If not, why not? (You can mention particular group members if you wish.)

5. What was successful and/or challenging about your collaboration?

guidelines: YouTalk interview project

1338 days ago

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You, at Stanford University, will each be paired with a "cyber-chum" from Lynne Joyrich's Television Studies class at Brown University. After collaboratively choosing a broad topic to explore, you'll each pose and then answer four related questions about different aspects of television. You'll have from November 22 through Thanksgiving break to work on this. By December 1, you'll post the interview, along with your response to it, to a joint website, http://youtalktv.posterous.com

Monday, November 15

Contact information for your partner will be handed out by email. You should communicate over the course of the next week with some ideas for a theme and settle on a subject of shared interest. This subject might be a genre (e.g., reality TV, soap operas); an audience group (e.g., children, a fan community); a TV trend (e,g,, internet viewing, serialization); or a social issue related to media (e.g., globalization, violence). Email correspondence should work fine for this purpose, but you're also welcome to use a platform like Facebook or Google docs for your discussion.

Monday, November 22

Four substantial questions (50-100 words each) are due to your cyber-chum (with each of you writing your own set of questions for the other to answer, even though both sets of questions tie to the same broad theme on which you have agreed). Further, though all of the questions should be related to your theme, the four questions should engage the different dimensions of TV that we've studied. Thus, in each of your sets, there should be one question for each of the following areas:

  • TV as a cultural and technological form
  • TV's stylistic, rhetorical and narrative form
  • TV viewing and consuming
  • TV and social formations

Monday, November 29

Substantial responses to the questions (100-200 words each) due to your cyber-chum.

Wednesday, December 1

Write up a reaction (about one double-spaced page) to your partner's answers. Here are some questions you could consider:

  • How would you characterize the overall import of these opinions?
  • Was the response about what you expected, or did anything surprise you?
  • Do you agree or disagree; and did you find that your experiences match up or not?
  • Based on the interview, do you and your partner have similar or different TV viewing habits, pleasures, and understandings?
  • What larger implications or new perspectives on the course material does this text suggest?
  • What is suggested by the very fact that we have TV in common and can discuss it, via digital media, across geographical distances?

You should post the text of the interview with your reaction to posterous by noon PST. You'll be added to the blog as a contributor, so you can just email a document to [redacted]. For more details, see http://posterous.com/faq.

Check out your classmates' projects, and we'll discuss them in our final class! We also encourage you to comment on the various projects on the blog itself; in this way, the conversations begun with this project can continue!

evaluation: video responses

1401 days ago

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rubric for grading your videos

guidelines: video responses

1401 days ago

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WHAT

You will present a response to the week's material in the form of a short video (aim for five minutes). This doesn't need to be more complicated than a "video blog" commentary where you record yourself speaking, but you can choose to communicate in more elaborate or creative styles. You’ll post your videos on the course website, and we’ll go over the available resources for producing and editing them. Keep in mind that this is not a production course, and your project doesn't have to be technically ambitious to succeed.

WHY

The goals of this assignment are to:  

  • learn and mobilize some technical and formal aspects of online video
  • communicate ideas in a visual medium
  • experientially engage with course concepts through participation
  • present course concepts to a general internet audience

HOW

As with your blog essays, you should give your responses some thought before you actually begin composing. Again, to begin formulating an analysis, you could try sketching out the main ideas of the readings, and listing any consequences, contradictions or critiques they bring to mind. You could also brainstorm elements of the screening materials or other familiar television programs that intersect with these thoughts. Start with some sort of outline or storyboard for your video.

Your response will communicate in more conversational and creative ways than an essay, but you should still present your own connection between concepts from at least one of the texts and a relevant show or phenomenon (whether that's something we look at in screening or something else of interest is up to you). Because this is a short video, you will most likely focus on one article or one particular idea from the readings, and on one episode/component of a television program or object. You can simply explain your ideas in a "video blog" style, combine such a nonfiction commentary with captions/illustrations, or use a more inventive visual rhetoric (for example: remix, machinima, or art).

There is a HOW TO page on the course website compiling links to video resources. You can meet with the professor and/or visit the tech desk in Meyer Multimedia Lab for individualized guidance.

Remember: save an extra copy of all your source before you begin editing! Keep in mind that video can take up many GBs of space. And save frequently and keep backups while you're working!

You will be evaluated based on your understanding of course material, the originality of your response, and the effectiveness of its presentation. The accompanying grading rubric offers further guidelines about the characteristics of exemplary (and not so satisfactory) videos.

WHERE/WHEN

Our official class platform is the video plugin on the course website. You can upload your video file directly or share a link or embed code from YouTube or another site if you prefer to host it there. Responses are due by midnight on Tuesdays (Y - 9/28 + 10/26, X - 10/5 + 11/2, W - 10/12 + 11/09, Z - 10/19 + 11/18) – make sure you leave yourself time to render and upload your file.

evaluation: blog essay

1401 days ago

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rubric for grading your blogs

guidelines: blog essay

1401 days ago

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WHAT

In this informal writing assignment (similar to a 2-page paper), you will present an argument about the week's material that references at least one reading and one television artifact. This response essay takes the form of a blog post on our course website, where the rest of the class can read and respond.

WHY

The goals of this assignment are to:

  • develop critical writing skills that enable you to communicate your ideas clearly
  • deepen your understanding and synthesis of course material
  • learn to formulate an argument using theoretical concepts 
  • approach academic composition as a continuing process
  • engage with the blog as a medium different from the printed page

HOW

Taking the opportunity to write notes, brainstorm ideas, and/or outline before class will help you determine what questions you'd like us to address. You can take advantage of our Monday meetings to ask questions that will contribute to developing your argument.

To begin formulating an analysis, you could try sketching out the main ideas of the readings, and listing any consequences, contradictions or critiques they bring to mind. You could also list elements of the screening materials or other familiar television programs that intersect with these thoughts. Your goal is to make a connection between concepts from at least one of the texts and a relevant show or phenomenon (whether that's something we look at in screening or something else of interest is up to you).

This essay is short response to the week's content. As such, you will most likely focus on one article or one particular idea from the readings, and on one episode/component of a television program or object. You should: explain the concepts from the text(s) that support your interpretation; describe the significant aspects of your artifact; and articulate, as a cogent argument, your synthesis of these.

Unlike a typical essay, your blog post does not need to have a formal tone and structure (e.g. an introduction and conclusion). However, it should consist of well-constructed paragraphs and readable prose and contain a clear statement of your main idea. To take advantage of the blog format, assume that your classmates are your audience, and aim to stimulate further discussion (for example, you could pose questions explicitly). You are encouraged to include links, images, etc. in your post.

This assignment will be evaluated on the basis of your understanding of course material, the strength of your analysis, and how well you communicate your ideas. The accompanying grading rubric offers further guidelines about the characteristics of exemplary (and not so satisfactory) responses. I can also provide individual consultations and/or handouts on writing skills if you'd like additional direction.

WHERE/WHEN

See the HOW TO post on the website for instructions on creating a blog post. Essays are due by midnight on Tuesdays (Z - 9/28 + 10/26, Y - 10/5 + 11/2, X - 10/12 + 11/09, W - 10/19 + 11/18).

syllabus - Introduction to Television Studies

1414 days ago

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Television is arguably the most influential and ubiquitous mass medium of the last half century. Because of its familiarity and popularity, it is also often the medium most overlooked, dismissed, and maligned. Drawing from the history of television and of television scholarship, this course builds a theoretical framework for understanding this pivotal cultural form. We will cover interdisciplinary approaches to studying TV texts, TV audiences, and TV industries, including questions of the boundaries of "television" (from independent and avant-garde video to convergence). In the process, we'll develop our own methodological tools as critical television viewers.

SPACES

On Monday's meetings, the professor will lecture and lead discussion. Wednesday's meetings will consist of open discussion, with certain students assigned to bring questions and facilitate.

To foster experiential learning about media, we will be using a dedicated website at [HERE] for all course work. This is a social network platform that supports blogs, wiki-like pages, bookmarks, threaded discussion, file uploads, status updates ("the wire"), live chat, and streaming videos. You are encouraged, but not required, to use the site to collect and discuss relevant material outside of class (above and beyond the stipulated homework).

TEXTS

You are expected to complete the reading (three chapters or articles averaging around 75 pages) by Monday's session each week. The professor will distribute a "virtual reader" containing PDF copies of all course texts at the beginning of the term. You are responsible for bringing printed or electronic copies of the week's materials to class so you can refer to them.

Screenings are sourced from accessible DVDs and websites whenever possible, but not all videos will be available to "make up" outside of class. Some, but not all, of the books and DVDs on the syllabus are on reserve in the Art library for you to consult.

POLICIES

Laptops and/or mobile devices are encouraged in class, although there may be some designated computer-free time. You are expected to be aware of your own attention and stay focused on lecture and discussion.

Attendance at all class and screening sessions is required. If you have a conflict or illness that causes you to miss class, contact the professor in advance. Grade penalties will be imposed for excessive unexcused absences.

Late work is discouraged. Most assignments are integrated with class activities and thus do not accommodate lateness. If you are facing extenuating circumstances and need an extension, contact the professor in advance. Grade penalties will be imposed for unexcused late work.

Plagiarism will not be tolerated. For more information on avoiding plagiarism and the rest of Stanford's Honor Code, see http://stanford.edu/dept/vpsa/judicialaffairs/avoiding/guide.htm

Students who have a disability which may necessitate an academic accommodation or the use of auxiliary aids and services in a class, must initiate the request with the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC), located within the Office of Accessible Education (OAE). The SDRC will evaluate the request with required documentation, recommend appropriate accommodations, and prepare a verification letter dated in the current academic term in which the request is being made. Please contact the SDRC as soon as possible; timely notice is needed to arrange for appropriate accommodations. The Office of Accessible Education is located at 563 Salvatierra Walk (phone: 723-1066; TDD: 725-1067).

ASSIGNMENTS

You will complete two blog essays, two video responses, a group video project, a final paper, and other weekly contributions as detailed below. Handouts with more detailed guidelines for the major assignments will be provided. At the beginning of the term, the class will be divided into four groups (A-B-C-D) for staggered due dates and final projects.

.blog essay (two, due by midnight on Tuesday)

In this informal writing assignment (similar to a 2-page paper), you will present an argument about the week's material that references at least one reading and one television artifact. The goal is to develop skills in academic composition and basic HTML competence.

.video response (two, due by midnight on Tuesday)

Here, you will work on media literacies by presenting an argument about the week's material in the form of a short video (aim for five minutes). This doesn't need to be more complicated than a "video blog" commentary where you record yourself speaking, but you can choose to communicate in more elaborate or creative styles. You may check out a Kodak zi8 camera and use resources in the Meyer Multimedia Lab and/or use your own camera/webcam and computer.

.discussion (two Wednesdays)

Wednesday's peer-facilitated discussions are an opportunity to practice leading and moderating a conversation. The members of one group will be responsible for proposing topics, fielding comments, making connections, and keeping us on topic. To prepare, come up with a few fruitful questions about the screening materials that connect them to Monday's readings. You should also peruse your classmates' blogs and video responses, and consider prompting discussion that builds on their work.

.website contribution (two Wednesdays)

On weeks when you don't have another assignment, you should make at least one contribution of your choice on the course website before class. You could leave a comment in response to one of your classmate's posts, link us to a relevant article or artifact in bookmarks, or share a video or other media of interest.

.interview project (due before class December 1)

For "YouTalk," your group will be paired with a group of "cyber-chums" from Lynne Joyrich's Introduction to Television Studies class at Brown University. Beginning on November 22 (over Thanksgiving break), you'll collaborate virtually to interview each other about your habits and pleasures as TV and video viewers. You will post the results (in the format of your choice) using a "page" on our course website, finishing before our final Wednesday meeting so we can discuss your work.

.group video project (December 8, 12:15pm)

Your group will go on to create a final video on the theme of "TV 2025: Imagining Media Futures." You may build on and even incorporate your work from the individual video responses and YouTalk project. These videos will be featured on SCBN, the Stanford student television station (http://scbn.stanford.edu). We'll meet during the course's final exam period to finalize the technical details and screen your videos.

.final paper (due by midnight on December 10 by email)

For your final assignment, you will expand one of your blog posts or video responses into a 6-7 page paper that draws on course texts to analyze a television artifact of your choice. The professor will meet with you individually to help you develop your argument. 

ASSESSMENT

For the major assignments, a handout with the criteria for evaluation will be provided in advance. Essays and the final video will be graded via this structured rubric. For other weekly and overall contributions, you will receive comments more informally by email, on the website, or in person.

Grading is typically on a 9-point scale: 9/8 = A range,  7/6 = B range,  5/4 = C range,  < 4 = unsatisfactory

Final grades will break down as follows: blog essays – 20% (10% each), video responses – 20% (10% each), discussion facilitation and participation – 10% overall, website contributions – 10% overall, YouTalk project – 10%, group video project – 15%, final paper – 15%

SCHEDULE

[0] INTRO ◊ September 20-22

→ no screening – no assignments

Reading (for Wednesday)

  • Allen, Robert C. "Frequently Asked Questions: A General Introduction to the Reader." The Television Studies Reader. Ed. Robert C. Allen and Annette Hill. Routledge, 2004. (1-18)
  • Scannell, Paddy. "Television and History." A Companion to Television. Ed. Janet Wasco. Blackwell, 2010. (51-66)
  • McLuhan, Marshall. "The Medium is the Message." Understanding Media. MIT Press, 1994. (7-22)

[1] TECHNOLOGY ◊ September 27-29

→ A blog – B video – C discussion – D website

Reading

  • Dienst, Richard. "The Outbreak of Television." Still Life in Real Time: Theory After Television. Duke University Press, 1994. (3-35)
  • Williams, Raymond. "The Technology and the Society." Television: Technology and Cultural Form. Routledge, 2003. (1-25)
  • Spielmann, Yvonne. "Video: From Technology to Medium." Art Journal 65:3 (Fall 2006): (55-70)

Screening ◊ sci-fi

  • "Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman" (Dara Birnbaum) [05] {VDB.7}
  • "Boomerang" (Richard Serra and Nancy Holt) [10] {VDB.2}
  • "Global Groove" (Nam June Paik) [30 - excerpt] {DVD}
  • "The Eternal Frame" (Ant Farm and T.R. Uthco) [22] {VDB.7}
  • "Wetwired" from The X-Files [42] {DVD}
  • "Blipverts" from Max Headroom [42] {DL}

[2] FLOW ◊ October 4-6

→ A website – B blog – C video – D discussion

Reading

  • Butler, Jeremy G. "Television's Ebb and Flow in the Postnetwork Era." Television: Critical Methods and Applications. Routledge, 2006. (3-18)
  • White, Mimi. "Crossing Wavelengths: The Diegetic and Referential Imaginary of American Commercial Television." Cinema Journal Vol. 25, No. 2 (1986): (51-64)
  • Uricchio, William. "Television's Next Generation: Technology/Interface Culture/Flow." Television After TV. Ed. Lynn Spigel and Jan Olsson. Duke University Press, 2005. (163-182)

Screening ◊ variety shows

  • Sesame Street [excerpts]
  • PBS "Pioneers of Television: Late Night" [excerpts] {DVD}
  • The Tonight Show [clips] {YouTube}
  • The Tonight Show 1/22/2010 (Conan's last show) [42] {DL}
  • Discovery Channel's "The World is Just Awesome" [01 + selected mashups] {YouTube}

[3] LIVENESS ◊ October 11-13

→ A discussion – B website – C blog – D video

Reading

  • Feuer, Jane. "The Concept of Live Television: Ontology as Ideology." Regarding Television. Ed. E. Ann Kaplan. Greenwood Publishing, 1983. (12-22)
  • Morse, Margaret. "The News as Performance: The Image As Event." Virtualities: Television, Media Art, and Cyberculture. Indiana University Press, 1998. (36-67)
  • McPherson, Tara. "Reload: Liveness, Mobility and the Web." The Visual Culture Reader. Ed. Nicholas Mirzoeff. Routledge, 2002. (458-70)

Screening ◊ news

  • MSNBC.com "flow" video [07] {course website} + Good Morning America [clips] {website}
  • TV coverage of the John F. Kennedy assassination [excerpts]
  • "Four More Years" (TVTV) [60 - excerpt] {VDB.8}
  • "The Business of Local News" (University Community Video, Minneapolis) [17] {VDB.7}
  • "Citizen Cam" (Jérôme Scemla - Canal +, Paris Première and Saga Films, Iceland: 1999) [26]
  • "Spin" (Brian Springer) [10 min. excerpt] {YouTube}

[4] FORM ◊ October 18-20

→ A video – B discussion – C website – D blog

Reading

  • Feuer, Jane. "Genre Study and Television." Channels of Discourse, Reassembled (2nd edition). Ed. Robert C. Allen. UNC Press, 1992. (138-160)
  • Mittell, Jason. "The Form of Television Narrative" + "Formal Analysis in Action: The Case of Lost" from "Telling Television Stories." Television and American Culture. Oxford University Press, 2009.
  • Haralovich, Mary Beth and Michael W. Trosset. "'Expect the Unexpected': Narrative Pleasure and Uncertainty due to Chance in Survivor." Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture. Ed. Susan Murray and Laurie Ouellette. NYU Press, 2004. (75-96)

Screening ◊ marooned

  • "WrongWay Feldman" from Gilligan's Island [25] {DVD}
  • Lost (first season episode TBD) [42] {DVD}
  • Survivor (first season episode TBD) [42] {DVD}
  • mashups of Lost and Gilligan's Island {YouTube}

[5] AUDIENCE ◊ October 25-27

→ A blog – B video – C discussion – D website

Reading

  • Morley, David. "Changing Paradigms in Audience Studies." Remote Control: Television, Audiences, and Cultural Power. Ed. Ellen Seiter et al. Routledge, 1989. (16-43)
  • Ang, Ien. "In the Realm of Uncertainty: The Global Village and Capitalist Postmodernity." Living Room Wars. New York: Routledge, 1996. (162-180)
  • Meehan, Eileen R. "Watching Television: A Political Economic Approach." A Companion to Television. Ed. Janet Wasco. Blackwell, 2010. (238-255)

Screening ◊ advertising

  • "Lucy Does a TV Commercial" from I Love Lucy [22] {DVD}
  • "Jack-Tor" from 30 Rock [22] {DL}
  • Mad Men (season 1 episode TBD) [42] {DVD} + Clorox and other commercials aired during Mad Men
  • The Price Is Right [clips]
  • The Apprentice (first season episode TBD) [42] {DVD}
  • "America's Next Top Commercial" and "Product Placement" (student videos) [10] {course website}
  • "Production Notes: Fast Food for Thought" (Jason Simon) [excerpt]

[6] GENDER ◊ November 1-3

→ A website – B blog – C video – D discussion

Reading

  • Spigel, Lynn. "Television in the Family Circle." Make Room for TV. University of Chicago Press, 1992. (36-72)
  • Modleski, Tania. "The Rhythms of Reception." Regarding Television. Ed. E. Ann Kaplan. Greenwood Publishing, 1983.
  • Streeter, Thomas and Wendy Wahl. "Audience Theory and Feminism: Property, Gender, and the Television Audience." Camera Obscura 33-34 (1994): (243-261)

Screening ◊ soap

  • classic soap opera [clips]
  • Passions (episode TBD) [42]
  • Desperate Housewives (episode TBD) [42] {DVD}
  • Wife Swap (episode TBD) [42]
  • Semiotics of the Kitchen (Martha Rosler) [06] {DVD}

[7] RACE ◊ November 8-10

→ A discussion – B website – C blog – D video

Reading

  • Lentz, Kirsten Marthe. "Quality versus Relevance: Feminism, Race, and the Politics of the Sign in 1970s Television." Camera Obscura 43 (2000): (45-93)
  • Harper, Phillip Brian. "Extra-Special Effects: Televisual Representation and the Claims of the 'Black Experience.'" Living Color: Race and Television in the United States. Duke University Press, 1988. (62-81)
  • Sasha Torres, "Television and Race." A Companion to Television. Ed. Janet Wasco. Blackwell, 2010. (395-408)

Screening ◊ comedy

  • "Lionel Moves Into the Neighborhood" from All in the Family [22] {DVD}
  • "The March" from The Cosby Show [22] {DVD}
  • "Mammy Dearest" from A Different World [22] {YouTube}
  • Ugly Betty (episode TBD) [42] {DVD}
  • Outsourced (episode TBD) [22] {hulu}
  • I'm the One that I Want [excerpt] {DVD}

[8] CONVERGENCE ◊ November 15-17

→ A video – B discussion – C website – D blog

Reading

  • Caldwell, John. "Convergence Television: Aggregating Form and Repurposing Content in the Culture of Conglomeration." Television After TV. Ed. Lynn Spigel and Jan Olsson. Duke University Press, 2005. (41-74)
  • Deuze, Mark. "Convergence Culture and Media Work." Media Industries. Ed. Jennifer Holt and Alisa Perren. Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. (144-155)
  • Uricchio, William. "The Future of a Medium Once Known as Television." The YouTube Reader. Ed. Pelle Snickars and Patrick Vonderau. National Library of Sweden, 2009. (24-39)

Screening ◊ web/TV 

  • "Occupation" from Battlestar Galactica [42] + The Resistance [35] {DVD} + selected Video Maker videos {web}
  • Quarterlife + 2/8 Life episodes (TBD) and associated videos [30] {YouTube, hulu}
  • "Star Spangled Chatter" and "Anthrax" (Jason Vosu) [03] {YouTube}
  • "Electronic Behavior Control System" (Emergency Broadcast Network) [05] {YouTube}
  • selected TV mashups and political remix videos

→ BREAK ◊ November 22-24

 

[9] FANDOM ◊ November 29-December 1

→ everyone – presentation of "YouTalk" projects

Reading

  • Busse, Coppa, Hellekson, De Kosnik, Russo, and Lothian. "In Focus: Fandom and Feminism." Cinema Journal Vol. 48, No. 4 (Summer 2009): (104-136)
  • Jenkins, Henry and Joshua Green. "The Moral Economy of Web 2.0: Audience Research and Convergence Culture." Media Industries. Ed. Jennifer Holt and Alisa Perren. Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. (213-225)
  • Hastie, Amelie. "The Epistemological Stakes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Television Criticism and Marketing Demands." Undead TV. Ed. Elana Levine and Lisa Parks. Duke University Press, 2007. (74-95)

Screening ◊ TV/fans

  • "Hollow Pursuits" from Star Trek: The Next Generation [42] {DVD}
  • "Storyteller" from Buffy the Vampire Slayer [42] {DVD}
  • "Remixing Popular Culture: Section 1 - Vidding" (Julie Levin Russo and Alexis Lothian, produced by Anita Sarkeesian) [40] {http://vimeo.com/13021751}
  • "Fan Vids and Life On Mars" (student video) and student-selected fan videos {course website}
Thanks to Lynne Joyrich for collaborating with me on this syllabus.

Group activity

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Julie Levin Russo added a new video titled Laura's second vlog (1324 days ago)

Julie Levin Russo added a new video titled Haley's SPOOF (1325 days ago)